Dracula — Better With Photographs

This telling of the story of Dracula is enhanced with 37 photographs of important locations, annotated old maps, and cultural artifacts. In addition, the book includes images of Dracula, female vampires, wolves, etc.

I first read Dracula as a young teenager. I remember it was Saturday afternoon, and both my parents and my sister were out of the house. The wind was making the branches scratch against my window, just like the bats in the novel, and the old house creaked. To preserve my dignity, let’s not say that I was “afraid”; let’s just say that I was “apprehensive.”

Recently I decided to read the book again. As I read, I had difficulty visualizing some of the locales and cultural artifacts that the characters mentioned. What do the Carpathian Mountains look like near dusk? Is there really an English town called “Whitby” with a ruined abbey? What did the harbor look like? What is a Kukri knife?

Accordingly, I have researched and inserted into this version of Dracula many photographs of important locations, annotated old maps, and cultural artifacts. I also considered it worthwhile to insert images of Dracula, female vampires, wolves, etc. to add a bit of color to the text.

Furthermore, I was disappointed that there were many historical, geographic, and cultural references in the text that were lost on me. As I researched these, I found that they enhanced my appreciation the story. For that reason, I have added appropriate hyperlinks that you can ignore or investigate if you are so inclined.

It’s only 99¢ in the Amazon Kindle Store.  I had a lot of fun enhancing my appreciation of this book. I hope you enjoy it as well!


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